Date changed to tour building

Dateline: Thu 19 Jun 2014

Thanks to Randy Baughn for posting on the Great Hoosier Daily:OPEN HOUSE DATE CHANGE!

FYI — date change — spread the word!? Thanks

From: <Hervey>, Emily Hervey <emily.hervey@indystar.com>
Date: Thursday, June 19, 2014 12:21 PM

Subject: DATE CHANGE: The Final Edition at 307 now 8/14/14

Please save the new date for our farewell building party!

The Final Edition at 307
Thursday, August 14, 2014
The Indianapolis Star, 6th Floor 
4:00 – 6:00pm

Invitations will be sent shortly.


Myrta Pulliam
Director, Special Projects
Star Media | IndyStarMedia.com
Office: 317.444.8008

 

2 comments

Happy anniversary

Dateline: Thu 15 May 2014

St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church in Indianapolis is celebrating its 75th anniversary this weekend -- and as Jerry Garcia said, "What a long...strange....trip it's been."

In disclosure, I am a Catholic convert, and most people know converts are unusually hard-core on the faith. So forgive me my trespasses here.

My decision to become a Catholic was based largely on the examples set by two men years ago. One was a priest in Evansville who worked tirelessly and with graceful humor with the poor. He was a Dutch Catechism kind of guy, more interested in the spirit than the letter of the law -- he embraced the post-Vatican II liberal church. The other was an Evansville newspaper editor whose blood ran Madonna blue, a traditionalist from the British John Cardinal Newman school. The editor did not mince words on matters of integrity, morality and faith -- or journalism, also a sacred credo.

I took the priest's advice when we moved from our quaint, impoverished Evansville parish to Indianapolis. "You have to check out St. Thomas Aquinas," he said. Wait 'til you see it. That's where you belong."

He did not mean only the building, although in 1970 STA became a contemporary structure designed and built by architect Evans Woolen, a "church for the revised Catholic liturgy" where the iconic crucifix does not exist but a huge, bright-red art cross hangs on unpainted concrete walls, the altar was cast of stainless steel, and the pews are "in the round."

The church was unvarnished until time for Mass; then the people rocked out. This was the tail-end of the Pope John Paul "revolution," which meant Masses sometimes included -- at STA anyhow -- clowns, interpretive dancing and thrumming guitars. Oh, and gender-free references to God. (Use "God" as opposed to "Him.")

More importantly, STA is in the heart of the Butler-Tarkington neighborhood, and both bodies were as racially integrated as a Catholic church and a cozy, traditional neighborhood that survived white flight could be. STA was "part of the solution not the problem" and believed in "bloom where you are planted," thus welcoming racially blended families and people of all color and sexual orientation.

To my mind, during my early years at STA, the parish sometimes diverged into a season of silliness. At one Lenten Mass, a lay leader took the pulpit and explained we were all being given rocks to take home. We were to contemplate these rocks -- but, why, I never really understood. It was so fuzzy and feely that I thought it was nutty, and that surely I was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

So when I made fun of the rock thing to my colleague and fellow Catholic at the Star, the benevolent John Shaughnessy (a cradle Catholic), he joined in the laugh, then allowed, "I just figured, well, why not? Maybe these people just have more faith than I do."

That was admirable, and while I tried to believe it, there were times when our paths and STA no longer crossed. We moved into the St. Joan of Arc parish; we went to church there. We moved to St. Luke's neighborhood; we worshipped there.

Somehow, we always ended up back at STA.

For "traditional" Catholics like myself, the point of the Mass is to celebrate the Eucharist: the body and blood of Christ. At STA, it is also important for some folks to voice their prayers and social justice/political concerns (a tradition that became a boiling point a year or so ago, but that's another story). The larger tension between the liberal faction of church and the more conservative Vatican leadership over past years -- up until the most recent Pope Francis -- has played out at STA.

All that aside, I've stayed. I've gone, I've come back, and I'm staying. I'm going to the birthday party.

An acquaintance, Jeffrey McCall, a media professor at DePauw University, is a loyal Catholic who worships at St. Paul's in Greencastle, where I also lived and prayed. This was during a time of much anger and despair towards the church regarding the sex abuse scandals and cover-ups. I asked McCall one day after Mass what the secret was of his fidelity. How could he, an analytical man, stay so rock-steady when the whole church was stinking with corruption.

"The church is like your mother," he said. "And if your mother was in trouble, you wouldn't leave her, would you?"

No. And that explains the loyalty of many Catholics who continue to pack the pews despite the dissension of the past decades. A story, incidentally, that never makes the mainstream news.

I feel the same loyalty for my little parish, which one friend refers to as "the last stop on the way out the door of Catholicism" for many people. That could not be less true for me, but for some, perhaps it's so.
 
It's not perfect. But it's my church.
5 comments

Goodbye, and thanks for all the cockroaches

Dateline: Wed 14 May 2014

It's soon to be last call for the old Indianapolis Star and News building at 307 N. Pennsylvania. The party/tour will take place Thursday Aug. 21 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Former employees and other Gannett refugees are invited to attend the event, which will start off on the 6th floor.  

The news operation will then take itself to the former Nordstrom building, and the process of tearing down and turning the old newspaper digs into an apartment/retail complex will begin.

One friend tells me that siblings and former owners Myrta and Russ Pulliam will lead tours of the building, which obviously is directed towards those of us who once worked there. If you want to go, you must send an email to emily.hervey@indystar.com

RSVP is required.

Oh, so formal for what was once such a chaotic operation -- gathering news, printing it and making money to boot. Not that any of US ever cared about the latter.

Facebook followers of the Great Hoosier Daily (aka the News) have been enjoying nostalgic newsroom photos posted by former News shooter John Marshall Flora, which brings up a No. 1 concern: what becomes of the archives at the paper? I'm talking about photo negatives and everything else that was housed in the "morgue" -- the repository for clippings, pictures, and all good things.

I'm going to try to get an answer to that, and if anyone knows, please speak up.

As a pile of bricks, the Star News plant is nothing much to write about. It is not an architectural gem, although the Star's Tony Cook reported that the building has housed the state's largest newspaper for more than 100 years.

But newspaper people know the real lure is in looking the other way, as writing coach Don Fry of the Poynter Institute used to suggest -- in this case backwards in time. Many of us have happy and sometimes intense memories of our labors of love and other labors there.

I am serious about the cockroaches, and I hope nobody takes offense -- newspapers and cockroaches, after all, have a long history -- look to Don Marquis' "Archy and Mehitabel" for a tale of incipient tension. At various times, ours grew so large as to fit (one at a time) into a match box. But that's another tale, for another time.

Predicting a good turnout for "30."

 

 

 

 

8 comments

NUVO gets a live one

Dateline: Sun 06 Apr 2014

http://www.nuvo.net/GuestVoices/archives/2014/03/18/your-kid-and-my-kid-are-not-playing-in-the-pros

This column by Dr. Louis Profeta, an ER physician at St. Vincent's, is so good it does not require any commentary from me.

It is a must-read for all of you who care about kids, kids' sports and the desire by parents to push their children onto the athletic playing field, including the swimmig pool, even after a ruptured spleen or a DUI. This man speaks with the voice of experience and authority, and he is arch, funny and on target.

My only real comment is that I now expect my grown children to call home four times a week.

NUVO is to be congratulated for running this commentary.

More of this.

1 comment

Insurance at the Star

Dateline: Sun 06 Apr 2014

Does Gannett have any desire to attract reporters who have families?

Not if its insurance package is to be believed.

An acquaintance said the corporation's insurance plan for a family costs $500 a month with a $6,000 deductible.

If that information is true -- I have no reason to doubt it -- then Gannett is making its priorities clear. Once a reporter has a partner and dependents, it's either adios or a lower standard of living.

 

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